Feral Game Hunting Kit

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atlas_melbourne
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2020 5:48 pm

Feral Game Hunting Kit

#1 Post by atlas_melbourne » Thu Aug 20, 2020 5:32 am

Hi all,
I'm new to the forum and this is my first post, and i'll begin by stating that I have NEVER shot a bow before.

Forgive me if the following, or indeed this entire post, is filled with naiveties and misunderstandings - read "total noob".
Your feedback about whether I am on the right track here would be very much appreciated. Pull no punches. If it's stupid. Tell me it's stupid. I don't want to waste my money.

I'm interested in bushcraft/camping/motorcycles :auto-dirtbike: and hunting and have recently discovered that in certain times and places one can hunt pest game in Victorian State Forests with a bow - no hunting permits or licenses required. AWESOME. help the environment, learn a valuable skill and get a good dose of the nature. I'm in.

I'm very interested in hunting rabbits, foxes, wild dogs and feral pigs, either for eating (depending on the location/diseases) or for the bounty offered by the GMA (free bow for crack shots!)
I'm also interested in bow-fishing and maybe later larger game like Deer or Roos... but i think i'll just start by learning to shoot :Bow

I've used my COVID time to productively rifle through a billion different websites/articles and posts and I've come up with a kit.
I'm not convinced I want a cheap beginners kit or one of the more gimmicky looking bushcraft/survival bows. I want something effective, lightweight, durable and generally forgiving on the hunt, but obviously I don't need the best of the best.

My shopping list for a decent hunting kit is the following. I've tried to go with something simple, even though compound bows just look so damn cool.


- Bear Archery Super Kodiak 50Lb + Case
- T.R.U Ball Speed Loop G Series
- T.R.U Ball T.R.U Nock
- T.R.U Ball Max Hunter 3 Caliper Head Release
- Limbsaver Everlast String Leech (4Pk)
- Thunderhorn Small Fry Quiver
- Bohning Bow String Wax TEX-TITE
- Bohning Broadhead Wrench
- Saunders Traditional Bow Stringer
- Redzone Slip-On Armguard
- Safari Tuff Rod Jenkins 3 Under Tab

Questions -
- What do I need, what do I most certainly not?
- Is a kit like this beyond my non-existent skill level?
- Big quivers/small quivers?
- Bohning Bowfishing Kit? :smile:


Arrows
( I still need to do the measurements on my arms to figure out the correct length)

- Easton Gamegetter Black Shafts
- ToPoint Bunny Blunts 135 Grain (TP-TP252)
- Muzzy 125 G Broadheads
- Rage 2 Blade SC 100 Grain
- Bohning Shield Cut X-Vane
- ToPoint TF802 Bowfishing Arrow
- Victory Pin Nocks


Questions -
- How many arrows should I be taking for a weekend of hunting? (Assuming some of them will end up buried in the ground in the bush or embedded in my own leg somehow)
- I've seen broadheads for like 2 bucks a-piece... good idea bad idea?
- I notice that people tend to stick to the mid range on arrow shafts, but they're certainly not buying cheap... What's the benefit of a High-end arrow set up?

Thank you all for reading, and best of health to you all in these trying times.
Atlas.

Wightamus
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 6:13 pm

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#2 Post by Wightamus » Thu Aug 20, 2020 6:59 am

Am I correct that you haven't shot a recurve before? I'm assuming this is the case if not I apologize.

It takes a bit of time to get proficient for hunting with a traditional bow and also to tune the bow and arrows. This means adjusting the length of the arrows and the weight of the points/broadheads.

Where in Victoria are you?

If there are clubs near by its a great place to start. Otherwise i'd personally start with a lighter bow (35# or so) then learn to shoot well with that and tune arrows well before moving on to a hunting weight bow.

If you're starting out its a lot of information to cover in a post. I'd be happy to give you a bell if you PM me.

Cheers

Matty

atlas_melbourne
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2020 5:48 pm

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#3 Post by atlas_melbourne » Thu Aug 20, 2020 2:30 pm

Hi Matty,

Thanks very much for your reply. Was it obvious i've never shot before? :lol:

Sent you a PM for further info, and i've signed up to Yarra Bowmen Victoria's mailing list so I can get in there once somebody figures out which broadhead kills COVID.

RobHunter
Posts: 244
Joined: Thu Sep 29, 2011 5:40 pm
Location: Cranbourne Victoria

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#4 Post by RobHunter » Fri Aug 21, 2020 1:26 pm

Hi Altas

Having been in the same situation, I can remember the indecision due to the immense amount of advice available on the internet.
It is very much personal specifics that can make the choices you have to make.

The following link has a section for equipment requirements for Deer in Victoria

https://www.gma.vic.gov.au/hunting/deer ... nting-laws

so if you want to hunt deer you must meet the set poundage requirement. (And purchase a deer hunting permit)

When I started I made a selfbow - first one was about 35#. I did struggle to draw this weight initially, till the muscles built up. then I made a 56#
self bow. Again initially took a while to build up strength. Once I was up to scratch I bought a 50#@28 Samick Phantom takedown recurve, which at
my draw of 31 inches is around the same as my self bow. One warning is that at this poundage practicing in a suburban setting need to be done carefully
the arrows tend to go through things - ie fences, make shift targets, even with target points.

So the above reply re joining a club is spot on - also the Bow hunting shop I use has a range to try out bows before purchase.

So I guess my advice is don't rush out and buy, unless your budget allows you to own multiple bows. Mine certainly doesn't.

Rgds

Rob

atlas_melbourne
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2020 5:48 pm

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#5 Post by atlas_melbourne » Fri Aug 21, 2020 3:40 pm

Hi Rob & Matty,

Many thanks to both of you - very steep learning curve from your feedback.
Special thanks to Matty for taking the time to give me a call and explain everything.
Here is the gist of what we discussed in case there's anyone in a similar situation to myself.

Quick usage case-
- I want to hunt feral game, dogs and pigs being the largest animals
- I am interested in Bow hunting, not target archery
- I am COMPLETELY new and have never shot a bow before.
- Interested in Traditional Recurves and Longbows
- I want a light and quick to set-up kit for portability.

Important Steps as a Beginner

1) Join a forum and ask questions :biggrin:
2) Research local clubs in your area. Some clubs focus on Target Archery only. If you want to practice hunting skills Field Archery is more appropriate -
- you will be moving through the bush and shooting animal size targets at varying distances. This won't allow you to get used to a certain distance, and force you to learn to shoot in awkward positions.
For those of you in Melbourne CBD - Western Melbourne Field Archery in Laverton North is a good place to start
NB: Many if not all clubs will require you to join the ABA or Australian Bowhunting Association. For a small fee you get insurance and you can legally shoot at many clubs. Definitely do this as i'm sure most of us didn't tick the "Shoot yourself in the foot" option on our health insurance.
3) Learn to shoot before you go hunting. Repeatable form is the only way you are going to learn to tune your arrow to your bow and ensure that you are making kill shots and not wounding animals.
4) Start with a lower poundage bow and work your way up once you have achieved that repeatable form.
5) TRY a bow before you buy. Some shops won't allow you to try the bow before you buy.
6) Before you go hunting, take the time to read the laws and regulations for your STATE. There are so many differences its not funny. It can be extremely confusing. Game Authority websites are the best place to start. Victoria has a good manual that goes through everything.
For example - Bowfishing is simply considered spearfishing in NSW and Queensland but is ULTRA illegal in Victoria. So while I am interested in bowfishing, that is completely off the cards.
7) Understand that legality and morality needs to come first. Hunters and Bowhunters have been under intense scrutiny for decades and even a small mistake can blow up in the media and tighten down the whole sport for everybody. Read the hunting guides on your Game Authority website and follow those laws to the absolute letter. F#%k it up once and there is a chance you will F*&K it up for EVERYBODY. Note that laws surrounding hunting don't just concern game, they concern equipment, camping, fires, waste and carcass disposal, and specific locations and specific times. Be mindful and be respectful.

Gear Considerations
Let's start by TOTALLY IGNORING the gear list in my above post. Apart from being a poor choice for a beginner, it's sort of half a compound kit and half a traditional kit and makes no sense at all. :lol: :clap: I'm going to leave that part of it up because I think it highlights just how confusing getting into bow hunting can be when you are trying to sift through the whole internet.

1) There are great options for bows at all price ranges. What you are paying for is flexibility in terms of set up and various features.
2) Start with a lower poundage, and work your way up with repeatable form. Starting with a 50lb will slow your form curve, as you will be fighting the bow constantly until you build the necessary back and arm strength.
3) Understand that a 35lb bow with a tuned arrow within range can put an arrow through and through most game. If you are not meeting legal poundage requirements (for Deer in VIC) a 50 pounder to hunt rabbits could be considered overkill, especially for a beginner.
4) Understand the limitations of traditional and traditional recurve bows. 50lbs means you are holding 50lbs on three fingers while you acquire the target, aim, adjust for wind and movement and wait for the animal to turn broadside. The longer you hold, the more wobbly you get and the less chance you have of hitting the target.
A compound bow's cams will reduce that 50lbs significantly when drawn, meaning you can hold it for much longer with less effort. Compound bows also dramatically increase the RANGE you can feasibly shoot at. Some compound bows will extend out to acceptable rifle ranges. If you want to shoot traditional you are going to have to get closer to your target. Much closer. You also don't have the conveniences of sights, stabilisers and sear releases etc.
5) Start buy buying pre-fletched arrows and don't stress too much about the details of them. Take the recommendations of the shop you are buying from. Once you develop repeatable form you can really delve into balancing arrows and tuning them to your bow and the game you are hunting.

Traditional

- A Samick Sage 35lbs can be purchased for about $250 bucks and is a great bow for the price and good for learning on.
Remember that if you ever want to move up to deer or larger game you will just have to buy a whole new bow. Enter that gorgeous Bear Archery Kodiak 55lbs.

Takedown Recurves

- With this option I am paying more money, but I am gaining flexibility. I can purchase a riser and some 35lb Limbs, making it a great bow for learning on and hunting small game. Later i can purchase 50+ pound limbs to meet legal poundage limits or hunt larger game. 2 bows in 1.
- This also allows the bow to be deconstructed into 3 smaller pieces. This can be more suitable for dudes like me who won't be in the bush solely to hunt and need to haul other gear.

- Purchasing a bow with ILF (International Limb Fitting) mechanisms means you are not locked into that brand. Purchase any ILF limbs and fit them to your ILF riser.This really allows you to dial in a custom bow later, and take full advantage of Archery Shop sales.
If you do not purchase a bow with ILF, just know that you will need to stick with that brand for later on (so probably best to pay a bit more and buy something known for quality)

- A Gillo Ghost riser is a very decent ILF riser, but of course you are paying many times more than a Samick Sage and you still have to buy the limbs and other gear! Take your budget into serious consideration when buying a bow.
- It's also made of metal and not wood so if you're really into the craftsmanship of a traditional wooden bow then this might not be for you.
- A Hoyt Satori riser is another great option.

So with all that said - i've had another crack at coming up with a shopping list. i'm willing to pay a bit more for something that appeals to me visually and something that is adaptable for the future. I'm too new to the sport to be thinking about having more than 1 bow (but something tells me that's where all the guys with 10 bows started)
I'm also seriously geeking out over Bear Archery's craftsmanship. I guess if you have to look at it all the time it should be beautiful to you.

- Bear Archery Take Down B Handle Riser RH
- 35lb Take Down Limb #3 (I will start with these and purchase 50-65lb limbs if I want to move up to deer or other larger game.)
- Bear Archery Recurve Stringer
- Bear Archery Take Down String
- Any brand Leather Shooting Glove or a Safari Tuff Rod Jenkins 3 Under Tab (Thoughts?)
- Any brand Full-length armguard - whatever is breathable and light.
- Bohning Broadhead Wrench
- Bohning Bow String Wax
- Bear Leather Pocket Quiver (seems good for my usage, light/small)

Pros:

- Its absolutely gorgeous
- Bear Archery have a great reputation
- Flexible between small/big game and novice to expert
- Can be packed into small package for bushwalking or motorcycle travel
- Satisfies my need to run around the bush looking like russell crowe in tin cloth leggings (this is the most important one)

Cons:

- This setup is 4 times the cost of a Samick Sage
- Its not a compound bow so everything that comes with that
- I will need to buy Bear Archery limbs later as their locking system is proprietary
- It's not the lightest, strongest or most expandable system for accessories.
- Bear Archery products are not sold in every Archery shop in Melbourne, I might have to find someone with this set up and try it before I buy it.

Arrows

Arrow wise i'm just going to start cheap and learn to shoot... once I have repeatable form I will be tuning some arrows for two main purposes.

1-Some cheap arrows for the 35lbs Limbs. These arrows will be for practice and hunting foxes/rabbits and probably set up with bunny blunts or cheap 2 blade broadheads. This is also to account for the probable act of me shooting constantly as i practice and breaking/losing some.

2- Once I have 50lb+ limbs I will purchase some much heavier, more durable arrows with some proper broadheads for deer/water buffalo/kangaroos and other larger permit game.

3- I will probably look at improving my small game arrows later and purchasing some better broadheads and more durable arrows.


Hunting

- Foxes are a great place to start. Rabbits are flighty, small and move like Keanu Reeves.
- There's a $10 Bounty on all fox scalps, so I can learn to skin/and dress an animal and get used to the visceral nature of it, even if i don't intend to use the meat or skin.
- I will hold off on hunting deer and larger game for some time.
- I will aim to hunt wild dogs for the $120 bounty. The reward for skilled hunting is a free weekend camping trip - arrows/fuel and food all paid for :)

Thanks all for reading. Huge post but a massive learning curve. Big thanks to Matty who provided a lot of information.
If anyone has anything to add, correct or any suggestions - feel free!

RobHunter
Posts: 244
Joined: Thu Sep 29, 2011 5:40 pm
Location: Cranbourne Victoria

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#6 Post by RobHunter » Fri Aug 21, 2020 7:06 pm

Hi again

Fyi

It seems like Samick bows are now manufactured by Galaxy Archery, with a new range of options. One US archery store states you may order Samick Sage and get either brand.
I found a place selling Samick Sage selling locally (springvale) for $209 and limbs for $135 - both avail in 25# to 60#. They have a range - but Covid has prevented personal
attendance atm.

My nephew bought a sage several years ago and the only negative was the string was crap - but the seller sent a new one when he complained. Whether the quality has
changed with the manufacturer I can't say.

I did buy the equivalent Ragim and it was rubbish - the limbs twisted that much the string came off - but ended up the dealer gave me Ragim Impala as a changeover (not extra cost) which is
pretty good.

I bought my Samick Phantom because it was the best I could afford with good reviews and have never regretted it.

rgds

Rob

flyonline
Posts: 79
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2016 7:18 pm
Location: NE Vic

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#7 Post by flyonline » Fri Aug 21, 2020 8:17 pm

atlas_melbourne wrote:
Fri Aug 21, 2020 3:40 pm

2- Once I have 50lb+ limbs I will purchase some much heavier, more durable arrows with some proper broadheads for deer/water buffalo/kangaroos and other larger permit game.
WOAH - NO native animals are legal to target with a bow (sharks/rays up and 'wild dogs' up north aside).
atlas_melbourne wrote:
Fri Aug 21, 2020 3:40 pm
3- I will probably look at improving my small game arrows later and purchasing some better broadheads and more durable arrows.


Hunting

- Foxes are a great place to start. Rabbits are flighty, small and move like Keanu Reeves.
- There's a $10 Bounty on all fox scalps, so I can learn to skin/and dress an animal and get used to the visceral nature of it, even if i don't intend to use the meat or skin.
- I will hold off on hunting deer and larger game for some time.
- I will aim to hunt wild dogs for the $120 bounty. The reward for skilled hunting is a free weekend camping trip - arrows/fuel and food all paid for :)

Foxes will be coming into whistling season soon with juveniles being kicked out in a few months. Good place to start. Also add goats, you get the added bonus of using your nose to find these guys and they're a lot less flighty than deer. Honestly, I wouldn't shoot anything with a blunt - I had a bad experience with a hare and blunt so I'll never shoot one at an animal again. There are plenty of ok-good quality broadheads for peanuts more than blunts and you can use them on foxes and goats. Keep an eye out on the classifieds, random assortments often come up. For stump shooting blunts I put a washer behind a field point and find no difference in shooting out to hunting distances.

Practice shooting in all situations, sitting, standing, kneeling, behind, uphill, downhill etc. Game very rarely appear at 15m broadside at the same level. Find everything you can by people like Tom Clumm Sr and Rod Jenkins, they're both very high level coaches who bowhunt so know what they're talking about. Both appear on plenty of podcasts for free, or they both offer digital courses if you're up for paying for proper 'lessons'.

The only thing I'd add to your arrows is look into footing the front end with a collar, often an inch or two of aluminium shaft but hobby brass tubing works great as well. It needs to be a tight fit, but adds a LOT of strength so you don't bust arrows on a miss. Make sure you get feathers unless you're shooting off an elevated rest - yes you can shoot vanes off the shelf but it is harder (there are the new 'trad vanes' designed to be shot off the shelf though).

Learn to sharpen your broad heads well until they are truly razor sharp. Single/double bevel is personal preference, but try sharpening both and see which you can get sharper. There's heaps of different ways and sharpening systems you can buy/make, so have a look around. Personally I made myself a lansky style from scrap and can get both single and double bevels scary sharp, but it took some learning (stropping was the hardest for me for some reason!) and as a bonus I can do my butchering knives with the same gear. http://www.bowhuntingaustralia.com/broa ... screw.html and https://outbackbroadheads.com.au/shop/ and https://www.kayugabroadheads.com.au/old-school are all Aussie companies and offer reasonably priced and well thought of broad heads in various options (there's a few others I haven't thought of as well).

Good luck with the dogs, I think you'll be needing it as even hardened and highly experienced hunters struggle to shoot them (and that's with guns).

Above all, just get out there and learn as you go. At least we're removing feral animals so if you don't end up taking the meat home and just use the first couple to practice butchering out, the environment is still ahead. As an incentive, I taught myself everything from scratch - shooting, butchering, building arrows and strings, sharpening broad heads, tuning arrows and now building bows from scratch. I'm now 8 goats, 2 foxes and a hare to the good and have had many quality goat curries, burgers and stews to add to the table. I've passed up shots on 4 or 5 times that number because I wasn't happy as well as missed a few along the way.

Can't beat that adrenaline rush :dance: :dance: :dance:

Steve

atlas_melbourne
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2020 5:48 pm

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#8 Post by atlas_melbourne » Sat Aug 22, 2020 9:34 pm

Hi Rob,
WOW. For a 135 bucks and the cost of a new string thats a great deal. Can I PM you for the link?
Steve,
Thanks for your reply! 'm struggling to find any information on the legislation at all regarding the use of bows specifically. It goes without saying that such a case would be in the appropriate state with tags and using the appropriate equipment according to law. So far i've been duped by bowfishing (only legal in NSW and NT?QNSLD? as "spearfishing") and now bow hunting roos? if it's not too much trouble are you guys able to provide sources or links?
Cheers for the broad head recommendations! Good to know about the blunts - at first glance they seem humane but I can imagine they are hardly as forgiving if you are not hitting perfect headshots.
I have a few questions -
- What material/brand shafts are you using for hunting and durability?
- Are these slip-ons on the outside of the shaft or the internal collars?
- Can I ask what gear your using for foxes and more specifically the shafts/vanes and collars?



When I was a kid we had staffys in our backyard and all our neighbours had cats so the birds nested through spring. Foxes got so bad they started pack hunting and stealing dog food, start tearing up lower nests. Any dead fox is a good fox.
Dogs are definitely the end-game. If I can get a gun license then awesome but the buy in cost is so much higher.
I hope I could one day move up to some serious poundage on a compound bow with sights and all the rest for dogs..
I think it might come down to a bit of luck, good strategy, and good winds. If you used rabbit offal and a wireless electronic caller to put them at the right range and flank and sat very quietly in a good spot..maybe. Anyone hunted wild dogs? :D

Cheers and thanks so much all for your detailed replies. Best of health!

Atlas

flyonline
Posts: 79
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2016 7:18 pm
Location: NE Vic

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#9 Post by flyonline » Sun Aug 23, 2020 9:57 am

atlas_melbourne wrote:
Sat Aug 22, 2020 9:34 pm
Steve,
Thanks for your reply! 'm struggling to find any information on the legislation at all regarding the use of bows specifically. It goes without saying that such a case would be in the appropriate state with tags and using the appropriate equipment according to law. So far i've been duped by bowfishing (only legal in NSW and NT?QNSLD? as "spearfishing") and now bow hunting roos? if it's not too much trouble are you guys able to provide sources or links?
Cheers for the broad head recommendations! Good to know about the blunts - at first glance they seem humane but I can imagine they are hardly as forgiving if you are not hitting perfect headshots.
I have a few questions -
- What material/brand shafts are you using for hunting and durability?
- Are these slip-ons on the outside of the shaft or the internal collars?
- Can I ask what gear your using for foxes and more specifically the shafts/vanes and collars?
Re: roos, the old GMA website had something specific, but the best I can find now is the https://www.gma.vic.gov.au/__data/asset ... dition.pdf, page 106. This has a lot of good info too on shot placement etc., (just ignore the bit about how to shoot bows!).

Re: shafts and footers, I've used Easton XX75 Gamegetters in aluminium and Gold Tip Trads and Hunters and a generic shaft in carbon. Each shaft comes in various spines, finishes and options all of which change the outer diameter of the shaft but you should be able to find the info on the web (e.g. GT Trads are slightly thicker than the Hunters in the same spine because they have the faux wood finish). For ease and lower costs, just pick a standard insert size (say .246") and go from there - then your inserts can swap across different spines/shafts as you try new things. Once you get a bit more time under your belt then try thinner shafts etc.

Simply put:
Aluminiums bend and can be straightened (with difficulty), but they will hold together if shot bent. They don't like extended UV exposure and can fracture if left outside for extended periods of time (like months, not a day or two).
Carbon won't bend, but can crack/fracture and will explode if shot broken and you'll end up with a shaft through your hand (plenty of pics/videos if your curious and can stand blood!!!!). Bend test before each shot, it takes a couple of seconds!!!

I've shot footed carbons into metal gates, hardwood fence posts and the like and only cracked 2 nock ends and broken one shaft. I shot aluminiums for a while, but they end up costing you more as they will bend on a bad shot and I can never get them straight again. They are good for footing carbon shafts though.

Footing can be both, but usually just external, here's an example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaDg52SJZfo

As a beginner it might be worth getting a stick of hot melt when you order your gear, that way you can easily change things around if/as required. Once dialed in you can go with epoxy or whatever if you want (some never go stronger than hot melt).

My current set up is:
55lb Recurve
Full length GT Hunters in 500 spine
3x 3" feathers
100gr brass insert
50gr brass footer (K+S hobby tubing)
200gr Outback Stealth broadhead

= 600grain arrow (600gr/55lb = 11gr/lb). 10gr/lb is a good place to start unless your shooting very light bows say sub 35-40lb.

I've just tuned up a fox specific setup as well:
40lb Longbow
Full length GT Hunters in 500 spine
3x 3" feathers
25gr aluminium insert
125gr broadhead (have various options)

= 400grain arrow = 10gr/lb. This was so I can hold at full draw for a longer time and have a nice quiet bow.

Hope that helps

Steve

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jindydiver
Posts: 1330
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 3:06 pm
Location: ACT

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#10 Post by jindydiver » Tue Aug 25, 2020 8:03 am

In regards to roos...
All indigenous wildlife is protected under the Wildlife Act 1975. No wildlife covered under the act may be harmed unless you obtain a licence (such as a game licence). Licences (called "authorisation" in the Act) come with conditions and there are no conditions that allow for the use of bows to take roos. The Minister has the power to allow you to use a bow, he chooses not to allow it.
Mick


Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power.

Abraham Lincoln

atlas_melbourne
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2020 5:48 pm

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#11 Post by atlas_melbourne » Sat Aug 29, 2020 8:35 pm

Hello all,
Thanks once again for all your help guys. That really clears things up.
Rob: Well noted on the Samick Sage and Ragim equivalents, I guess you get what you pay for... 200 bucks is hard to argue with though.
Steve: Love your work. What you've described is exactly where I want to go with this. It's not about killing. I want to do something for the environment and learn how to be self-sufficient and proficient with a weapon that I can use to feed myself. I'm only young (27) but I feel an immense detachment from nature. I grew up in the bush and the entirety of my soul screams go back! :D
Thanks all for your arrow recommendations.... that is definitely going to take some time to learn, but I think once I have learned to balance my arrows and do the basic math for it it doesn't seem so daunting.

If I wanted to go for wild dogs and wild pigs as an end goal (I feel as if these two particularly are creating the most environmental damage, and the pigs have the most harvestable material (MAYBE?!) am i on the wrong track with a take-down traditional? Should I be looking to move to a high poundage compound later on to increase my engagement range?

It looks like i'll be sticking to foxes to start with and working my way up to wild dogs and wild pigs, as difficult as that is. To get even one would be a monumental achievement in my mind.
I keep going back to kangaroos because there is so much harvestable material. Good lean meat, great dog bones and one of the best leathers in the world. It will have to wait until I have a rifle license and there are permits/licenses for culling in Vic. Legislation FIRST!

If there are any fox/dog/pig hunters out there - Can i ask what you are harvesting from the kills and what the conditions for that are?

E.g- Foxes - To claim the bounty you need to scalp the animal. while you are at it could you not harvest the coat? What about the meat? Could it be used as dog food?

Feral pigs - I am aware that you can harvest the meat providing that they are not in an area known for communicable diseases - thoughts? Do you risk it? Do you eat it? Give it to your dog? or just bury it?

Wild Dogs unfortunately I don't see any harvestable product except for the scalp-to-tail bounty requirement. They would make fantastic compost with a good set up, but i don't own a farm.

Any suggestions on how I could minimise wastage would be really helpful. Also any advice on what you guys are doing with feral game carcasses. Ive seen so many youtube videos of them just leaving these graveyards of dead pigs everywhere.... are they not harvesting any of that? is this because its private land and the farmer just wants them gone? confused. :think:

I've been looking through the Gov App for hunting zones (despite all the reports of people ending up on private land) and I've read that there are lots of feral game in the State Forests around Mt Beauty/Bright.. suggestions? Where could I apply myself to the greatest effect. I see that there are lots of Nature reserves surrounding that area so Im assuming that every feral kill on the State Forests nearby is helping in some small part.

Cheers all,
Ash

Edit: Steve - Any special considerations around goats? I bet they make a DELICIOUS curry/biriyani Camping7

Wightamus
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 6:13 pm

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#12 Post by Wightamus » Sat Aug 29, 2020 9:01 pm

People often go either way with pigs. I love to eat wild boar and think its pretty versatile, however if the flesh looks weird I avoid it and I ALWAYS check the organs. On top of this the meat generally gets frozen and is cooked through.

Foxes and dogs, I think you're just looking at the bounty but you could make use of the pelt if you wanted.

Goats are one of the best meats to slow cook (and is the most consumed meat in the world) stay away from the billy's. They **** all over themselves and smell like it. You could use the pelt and feed the meat to the dogs.

Deer. It's all good. I eat all the meat most the organs and boil the bones for stock. You could tan the hide but that's not a path I've gone down yet (although I have a couple in the freezer)

Hope this helps.

If you're going trad takedown recurve is my recommendation. If you want to bow hunt and be a lethal as possible maybe a compound but they are pretty different arrow launching devices.

atlas_melbourne
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Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#13 Post by atlas_melbourne » Sat Aug 29, 2020 9:29 pm

Hi wightamus,
What are the warning signs for pigs? i've read people saying they won't touch the meat at all because of the worms/ticks etc but as far as my research goes - the worms only live in the organs - if you don't mess up the field dressing you won't be eating worms . Likewise ticks only live on the pelt.
If I am just harvesting meat where is the danger? Do you avoid the meat just to be safe?
Goats sound like a good idea. are there good places to hunt them in Victoria? I know absolutely nothing about wild goats.
thanks for your recommendations on the foxes and dogs - It seems wasteful but for 10/120 bucks and one less pest murdering Australian native wildlife I feel like Nature and I are still one up..

Wightamus
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Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#14 Post by Wightamus » Sun Aug 30, 2020 9:21 am

Re: Pigs - Flesh might look mottled light and dark. The liver doesn't look healthy, mottled or spotty.

Wightamus
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Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#15 Post by Wightamus » Sun Aug 30, 2020 9:24 am

And goats; Are in Vic, I've only ever seen them in places where its illegal to hunt but I know many people do hunt them I just don't know where. I've been meaning to get out into some local states parks to look around but I'm lazy and live in Sambar country so generally just hunt around home.

flyonline
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Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#16 Post by flyonline » Sun Aug 30, 2020 7:45 pm

atlas_melbourne wrote:
Sat Aug 29, 2020 8:35 pm

If I wanted to go for wild dogs and wild pigs as an end goal (I feel as if these two particularly are creating the most environmental damage, and the pigs have the most harvestable material (MAYBE?!) am i on the wrong track with a take-down traditional? Should I be looking to move to a high poundage compound later on to increase my engagement range?
I can't comment on damage, but if you're serious about doing the most good then get a rifle period. You can get a shot off when a bow hunter is just starting to think about which direction to start stalking. Of course, you can do both (I've recently just got my gun license for exactly this reason - keep the freezer full and then use a trad bow for the 'chase') and anything you learn bow hunting will stand you in good stead with a rifle.
atlas_melbourne wrote:
Sat Aug 29, 2020 8:35 pm
It looks like i'll be sticking to foxes to start with and working my way up to wild dogs and wild pigs, as difficult as that is. To get even one would be a monumental achievement in my mind.
Nothing wrong with that - I figured that would shoot a number of foxes/rabbits before I graduated to 'big' game but actually shot a number of goats before I even got a chance on a fox and that was just to finish off a young pup my two dogs had more or less killed before I pulled them off.
atlas_melbourne wrote:
Sat Aug 29, 2020 8:35 pm
E.g- Foxes - To claim the bounty you need to scalp the animal. while you are at it could you not harvest the coat? What about the meat? Could it be used as dog food?

Feral pigs - I am aware that you can harvest the meat providing that they are not in an area known for communicable diseases - thoughts? Do you risk it? Do you eat it? Give it to your dog? or just bury it?

Wild Dogs unfortunately I don't see any harvestable product except for the scalp-to-tail bounty requirement. They would make fantastic compost with a good set up, but i don't own a farm.

Any suggestions on how I could minimise wastage would be really helpful. Also any advice on what you guys are doing with feral game carcasses. Ive seen so many youtube videos of them just leaving these graveyards of dead pigs everywhere.... are they not harvesting any of that? is this because its private land and the farmer just wants them gone? confused. :think:
Re: scalps, I don't have experience first hand, but one of my uncles shot foxes seriously back when they were worth something and does again now he's retired, but gets more from the farmers for a night out than the bounty now. When I asked him about it he suggested taking a plastic bag and using it as a glove, then folding it over the scalp and freezing it i.e. 1 scalp/bag as they stink pretty bad and is hard to get rid of. Once you have enough take them to be claimed.

Re: waste, from a goat you can easily get 2x back legs, 2x shoulders, 2x backstraps and whatever trim and neck meat you can be bothered to take (plus hide and horns for other uses, even tendons/sinew are useful). I've seen half a goat carcass disappear in 2 days and the whole thing (as in zero left, not even bones) in 10-14 days. As long as it's not left in a waterway and is clearly visible to the air for birds it will go pretty quickly. Of course 10 dead pigs on top of each other is another thing altogether. If you're back in the same area e.g. camping, it's worth stalking a known carcass as foxes will move in fairly quickly in following days.
atlas_melbourne wrote:
Sat Aug 29, 2020 8:35 pm
I've been looking through the Gov App for hunting zones (despite all the reports of people ending up on private land) and I've read that there are lots of feral game in the State Forests around Mt Beauty/Bright.. suggestions? Where could I apply myself to the greatest effect. I see that there are lots of Nature reserves surrounding that area so Im assuming that every feral kill on the State Forests nearby is helping in some small part.

Cheers all,
Ash

Edit: Steve - Any special considerations around goats? I bet they make a DELICIOUS curry/biriyani Camping7
Anywhere is good. You can find a fair amount via google - not necessarily via hunting websites. Just use a bit of common sense with the App when on the ground, if there's clear fenced paddocks marked as public land then probably there's an issue somewhere. Just be a little careful up in the high country as some areas are deer only i.e. no hunting pests. Goats are around - I only hunt public land and they like dryer rocky areas rather than wet gullies. During the summer they're tied to water every day or two as well.

Slow cooked goat is good many ways - curry, stroganoff, pulled, minced into burgers/meatballs etc. Cook loooooooooooong and slow for cuts/diced, minced as per usual (or perhaps just a tad more to be safe), I often do it for 12hrs plus in an auto slow cooker.

If you're serious, it would be worth looking into a Q fever vaccination. From memory mine cost a bit over $100 and only took a trip to a local GP that offered it to get it done with no special considerations (search the web as only some GPs will offer a clinic for it).

With pests and diseases, I was in the same boat learning everything for myself. Read up on locally prevalent problems and exercise good personal and meat hygiene. Wear gloves if you feel like it (I usually wear a cut-proof instead), have plenty of water to clean your hands/knives and take your time. As Whightamus says, check the organs for obvious problems and stick to healthy looking animals. If in doubt chuck it - it just ain't worth it!!! Plenty of people take game meat for dog food, but personally I wouldn't be game unless I followed the same precautions that I do for myself i.e. take only quality meat, freeze it and cook well before use as there are parasites/diseases that can infect pets as well - and they may be then passed onto your family.

Steve

atlas_melbourne
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Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#17 Post by atlas_melbourne » Mon Aug 31, 2020 7:02 pm

Steve & Wightamus
Thanks again guys that is so much golden information I am struggling to find on the net.
Steve you have got me dreaming of pressure cooked goat curry.
Well noted on diseases. No point taking chances when it comes to your health! I saw a video yesterday about Steve Rinella undercooking his bear meat and giving himself and 5 others Trichonosis. :clap:

Im definitely going for a rifle license, but I can hunt for free with a bow! Low cost way for me to learn to hunt and get used to using a weapon. No sense in a total noob tramping through the bush with his rifle sending game running in all directions. Read as : Into The Wild - "WHERE ARE ALL THE F*+$ING ANIMALS!" :D
I want to learn to get close..really close . Remain calm and shoot accurately . If I can do that I feel like ive earned a rifle :)

From all of your wonderful advice I will definitely be purchasing a little Sage 35lber with a good flemish string. Once ive got my form and know what im doing ill start looking for goats and foxes. Build from there I think...move up to that gorgeous Bear Takedown maybe.

Can't thank everyone enough who replied and put in time to answer all of these questions.


Part of me can't help but stare at that 2000 dollar Bear Archery Perception Compound bow with the funky riser....
Im curious - it seems like a lot of you guys have a variety of bows - is there purpose to each one? Did you build your collections over time and just never sold the old ones out of love? Or is it just that its good to learn all the different styles of bows and broaden your skillset? (Kind of like Streetbike riders should learn dirt to help improve road control)

Rhino1
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Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#18 Post by Rhino1 » Thu Sep 03, 2020 6:32 pm

Well done to the replies here, there's an absolute wealth of information in this post alone, it's a cracking good read too.
Good luck with it all Atlas, hope it works out for you, it's good to see ppl getting into it with the best intentions. Keep us posted with how it all goes, it probably wouldn't hurt to start taking a few overnighters out bush with the camera or look for animal sign or go for a fish, at least you can see what basics you truly need and what items you can do without, just being out there is good enough in my book.
Good luck mate
Cheers Rhino

flyonline
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Location: NE Vic

Re: Feral Game Hunting Kit

#19 Post by flyonline » Thu Sep 03, 2020 7:35 pm

If I was to start again now, I'd seriously look at some of the cheaper ILF rigs. If you pick up a cheap(er) set, you could add a half decent set of limbs at higher poundage later when you get into hunting more. Then if you want to upgrade your riser, the limbs will cross over also. Never shot any myself, but there is plenty of info out there on the internets.

I wondered the same thing on different bows when I started having a background in fly fishing. Using vastly different rods made me cast better overall. It's certainly worth having a light set of limbs (which it looks like you'll do anyway) to work on form, particularly when you hit a problem down the track - and trust me you will!! I usually have a clicker set up on one bow to make sure I hit the same draw length, but have gone from shooting with it all the time, to occasionally as I found myself turning into a shoulder pulling b@stard with it on all the time. Otherwise, the correct amount of bows = N + 1 where N is the current number you have at the moment :lol: :lol: I don't ask my wife why she NEEDS 30 pairs of shoes, and she doesn't ask me why I NEED 8 bows :lol:

Never tried slow cooker, might have to though....

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