A matter of choice

General discussions. Politics, scuttlebutt, whatever: you're getting married, changing jobs, got a gripe or a compliment, dying to get out with the bow etc.....

Moderator: Moderators

Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
Kendaric
Posts: 220
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:01 pm

A matter of choice

#1 Post by Kendaric » Sun Jul 12, 2020 3:20 pm

A really good and quite candid article in Archery Action Magazine this month from Nils Spruitt, which struck a cord, in so much as why so many of us choose traditional equipment over the modern compound.

User avatar
Stickbow Hunter
Supporter
Supporter
Posts: 11547
Joined: Sat Jul 26, 2003 8:33 pm
Location: Maryborough Queensland

Re: A matter of choice

#2 Post by Stickbow Hunter » Mon Jul 13, 2020 3:43 pm

I don't get the mag so can't comment on it sorry.

little arrows
Posts: 2839
Joined: Sun Feb 29, 2004 2:14 pm
Location: Sunshine Coast QLD

Re: A matter of choice

#3 Post by little arrows » Mon Jul 13, 2020 7:23 pm

Kendaric,
Only ABA members get the mag, or I guess you can buy it, could you regale some of the points that interested you, for the sake of discussion perhaps.
cheers
sue

User avatar
Kendaric
Posts: 220
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:01 pm

Re: A matter of choice

#4 Post by Kendaric » Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:04 am

Good point, my bad.

One would have to read the article in its entirety to get the full impact, but in many respects, it is a story of transition on a few different levels - but we will stick to the archery side of thing.

To summarise, decades ago, man shoots recurve barebow. Likes friends compound which shoots faster and flatter, and purchases one. Shoots it barebow with fingers (as everyone did then for ABA) and is happy. Gives away archery for a goodly period of time. Decades later wants to get into archery again and buys modern compound. Is aghast when it arrives, looks like a kids size bow, though it is an adults. Tries to shoot it barebow with fingers and is very unsuccessful. Bites the bullet and adds sights, D-loop and uses a release aid (what he thinks of as a 'trigger'). Shoots very well this way and can actually hit the group five targets (something he was never comfortable with before). It feels like shooting a rifle to him in many respects.

He realises that because of this, many modern compound shooters are taking ridiculously long shots a game that they are not capable, due to inexperience and a lack of hunting ability. They are reliant on their sights and release aids.

It was not the archery the way he use to enjoy or remember and yearned for the old ways. Sold compound and purchased a new recurve. He realises that Trad bows are to him a purest form of archery. To hunt with a bent stick and ability. In the main, anyone who opts to shoot a traditional bow is looking for more of a challenge, be it field archery or hunting.

He goes on to say, that today archery is a sport of choices, however if you ever go to a mixed shooting event, it is the trad shooters having the most fun.
Last edited by Kendaric on Fri Jul 17, 2020 1:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Outbackdad
Site Admin
Posts: 462
Joined: Tue Mar 31, 2009 11:46 pm
Location: Dalby

Re: A matter of choice

#5 Post by Outbackdad » Thu Jul 16, 2020 5:18 pm

Kendaric wrote:
Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:04 am
archery is a sport of choices, however if you ever go to a mixed shooting event, it is the trad shooters having the most fun.
:handgestures-thumbup:

Rhino1
Posts: 42
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2016 7:01 pm

Re: A matter of choice

#6 Post by Rhino1 » Mon Oct 26, 2020 7:00 am

Kendaric wrote:
Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:04 am
....man shoots recurve barebow. Likes friends compound which shoots faster and flatter, and purchases one. Shoots it barebow with fingers (as everyone did then for ABA) and is happy. Gives away archery for a goodly period of time. Decades later wants to get into archery again and buys modern compound. Is aghast when it arrives, looks like a kids size bow, though it is an adults. Tries to shoot it barebow with fingers and is very unsuccessful. Bites the bullet and adds sights, D-loop and uses a release aid (what he thinks of as a 'trigger'). Shoots very well this way and can actually hit the group five targets (something he was never comfortable with before). It feels like shooting a rifle to him in many respects.

He realises that because of this, many modern compound shooters are taking ridiculously long shots a game that they are not capable, due to inexperience and a lack of hunting ability. They are reliant on their sights and release aids.

It was not the archery the way he use to enjoy or remember and yearned for the old ways. Sold compound and purchased a new recurve
This really struck a chord with me, I shot an old timber limbed bear compound and recurve all through the 90s no sights, fingers with alloy or woods tipped with ribteks (they were the go cos that's what Brett Vercoe shot) my old man used to call me the goat slayer lol, and eventually I upgraded to a brand spanking Bear/Jennings Sonic XL compound, still shot it fingers/instinctive, in Tamworth there was a bloke who had a shop called appliance care and sold archery gear at the back of the store can't remember his name but I reckon I owe this bloke everything taught me everything I ever needed to know and looking back gave up a lot of time for me, then years later I started buying supplies from a bloke last name Hillier who had an archery shop in his garage I saw Camo dipping there for the first time on a Darton bow.
First carbon arrow I ever bought was in 97 and cost me $30 and I managed to not lose that for over a year and even took game with that one arrow haha.
I had a break and in 2001 moved to Qld where I went to eagle archery, I remember being in shock of the rows and rows of tiny, plastic looking bear compound bows, it looked so cheap and I remember being so disappointed and disgusted in Bear as a company. For some reason that really stuck with me and turned me off compound bows for another 13 years.
I now shoot anything at all, no prejudice. By being so stubborn I've probably missed out on a lot.

Post Reply